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Media release: 
23/10/2012

The George Institute and Peking University Health Science Center sign MOUAfter eight years of collaboration and friendship and two years of negotiations, The George Institute for Global Health and Peking University Health Science Center officially signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) recently at the Peking University campus.

Media release: 
18/10/2012

A landmark study by Australian and New Zealand researchers has found that a widely used starch fluid for resuscitation of patients in intensive care units (ICUs) provides no clinical benefit and its use results in increased acute kidney failure (haemodialysis) when compared to normal saline.

To screen for serious neck (cervical spine) injuries such as fractures in the emergency department, the Canadian Cervical Spine rule (C-Spine) appears to be more accurate compared with the National Emergency X-Radiography Utilisation Study (NEXUS) criteria, according to a review published today in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

Professor Simon Finfer, of The George Institute for Global Health, led investigators in this second study, which provided an important new analysis of the Normoglycemia in Intensive Care Evaluation–Survival Using Glucose Algorithm Regulation (NICE SUGAR) trial data.

Despite and perhaps because of the advances in biomedicine over the past few decades, chronic diseases, like heart disease, stroke, and diabetes are now rising in many places of the world and more worryingly they impose their heaviest burden on the poor and disadvantaged populations.

In 2002, 3.5 million people died of cancer in Asia. This is expected to increase to 8.1 million by 2020. As the death rate and prevalence of cancer hits hard in Asia, specific concerns have been raised about the economic toll of the disease on patients and their families. Ongoing treatments are expensive and can impose a considerable financial burden.

One quarter of the world’s adult population suffers from hypertension, and although it has no obvious symptoms, it can lead to heart attacks, stroke, kidney failure and blindness. Despite this, there has been great uncertainty as to how intensively blood pressure should be lowered to obtain maximal benefit and minimize risks.

Two thirds of younger, working age stroke survivors face economic hardship and are often forced to use savings or sell assets to pay basic living expenses, a new Australian study has found.

Media release: 
27/09/2012

Most Australian women are unaware that heart disease is their biggest killer and they are more likely to die from a second heart attack than men.

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