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Media release: 
24/05/2016

New research from The George Institute for Global Health and the University of Sydney has found that opioid painkillers, a common treatment for low back pain, provide minimal benefit.

Media release: 
23/05/2016

A medication used to treat one of the most common causes of kidney failure reduced the risks of kidney function loss or kidney failure by two thirds, according to a new study.

Professor Bruce Neal is one of Australia’s top clinical researchers whose work has exercised a heavy influence over general practice. Here he speaks with Australian Doctor.

The George Institute for Global Health has won the “Excellence in Research and Development between Australia and India” award from the Australia India Business Council (AIBC).

Research by The George Institute for Global Health which revealed paracetamol does not relieve back pain has been highlighted as one of the top 20 studies of 2015 for GPs.

Media release: 
17/05/2016

There is a strong link between driver licencing and employment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, according to new research from The George Institute for Global Health.

"Excess salt consumption increases blood pressure which is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Therefore we need strategies to reduce salt intake especially in populations at high risk of cardiovascular disease."

Media release: 
11/05/2016

Climate change may be accelerating rates of chronic kidney disease caused by dehydration and heat stress, according to a paper appearing in a recent issue of the prestigious Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN).

Media release: 
10/05/2016

The safety of a controversial clot busting drug has been investigated by researchers at The George Institute for Global Health, with results showing a modified dosage can reduce serious bleeding in the brain and improve survival rates.

Helping patients with heart disease to take their medications may be as simple as sending a text or giving them a polypill, researchers at The George Institute for Global Health have found.

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