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My five year old grandson started school last Monday with all the other new kids from all backgrounds in this great country we call Australia. He was a few months old on the day Kevin Rudd, as Prime Minister, delivered his speech to parliament on 13 February 2008 and gave the long-awaited national apology to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Already juggling three jobs and being a father of four, it is a surprise that Associate Professor Martin Gallagher also has the time to head up The George Institute's Renal and Metabolic Research division. Being inspired everyday to help patients is what drives his commitment.

Professor Simon Finfer of The George Institute received an Honorary Doctorate from the Faculty of Medicine of the Friedrich Schiller University in Jena earlier this month.

Professor Finfer was awarded the Honorary Doctorate for his outstanding work as a clinician and researcher, said Professor Kondrad Reinhart, Director of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine at Friedrich Schiller University in Jena, who gave the Laudatory speech in honour of Professor Finfer.

Motivated by the chance to deliver better health outcomes for Indigenous populations, Sharon Ponniah joined The George Institute in 2012 as Program Manager for the Kanyini Vascular Collaboration.

Mary Anne Land joined The George Institute for Global Health in 2010. Not even 12 months after completing her Masters in Public Health in her hometown of Wollongong NSW, she now finds herself completing an internship at The World Health Organization (WHO) in Geneva.

When Anushka accepted the position of Senior Research Fellow at The George Institute in 2001, she would have been completely unaware of the impact she was set to have at her new workplace. She commenced work on her PhD in the Institute’s cardiovascular division, focused on identifying the major cardiovascular risk factors in the Asia Pacific Region, work for which she received the University of Sydney’s Peter Bancroft Prize.

When Anushka accepted the position of Senior Research Fellow at The George Institute in 2001, she would have been completely unaware of the impact she was set to have at her new workplace. She commenced work on her PhD in the Institute’s cardiovascular division, focused on identifying the major cardiovascular risk factors in the Asia Pacific Region, work for which she received the University of Sydney’s Peter Bancroft Prize.

“I first came to Australia in December 2009 to commence my studies and work at The George Institute. I returned to Brazil in July 2010 to marry my lovely wife Marcia, who is also a researcher, and came back to Australia with me to also work at The George. Living in different countries for almost seven months made me realize that life is meaningless when you live far away from those that you love the most”. 

At 34, Praveen has already achieved many things in his medical career - leading community based trials in chronic disease, working in the field of HIV/AIDS and STI for a Gates Foundation project and currently working on a new project to help address type 2 diabetes in women in India - but according to Praveen, by far his biggest achievement will come to fruition in early 2012.

He’s published over 80 articles, and presented world-first research findings in more than a dozen countries. He has led numerous research projects, analysis and clinical trials and treated hundreds of patients, but Professor Vlado Perkovic is set to take the biggest step in his career, as the newly announced Executive Director of The George Institute Australia.

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