The George Institute For Global Health
Global
United Kingdom
India
China
Australia

Media releases

Media release: 
25/06/2018

Statement by Professor Bruce Neal of The George Institute, Australia:

Media release: 
21/06/2018

Six out of ten Australian packaged foods are highly or ultra-processed, more than half are discretionary/junk foods and only one third are healthy, according to a new analysis by The George Institute for Global Health.

Media release: 
13/06/2018

Australia now has many of the building blocks in place to roll out a digitally enabled health system that could transform care services, an expert report has found.

Media release: 
14/05/2018

A review of almost 50,000 Australian packaged foods has found the Health Star Rating (HSR) system provides sound dietary advice on more than 97% of products.

Media release: 
19/04/2018

Increasing numbers of people worldwide are suffering life-long disability and dying prematurely due to the ineffective treatment of people with multiple health conditions, a new report suggests. 

Media release: 
18/04/2018

An innovative mobile device-based health app to enable people in India to access essential diabetes care has been launched by The George Institute for Global Health, India.

Media release: 
05/04/2018

The George Institute has taken part in The Lancet Taskforce on non-communicable diseases (NCDs) which examines the costs and economic interventions that could help reduce the burden of NCDs worldwide.

Media release: 
05/04/2018

Taxes on soft drinks, alcohol and tobacco are a powerful response to rising rates of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) worldwide, according to the most comprehensive analysis to date of evidence on expenditure, behaviour and socio-economic status, published today in The Lancet.

Media release: 
14/03/2018

A sausage in bread could be considered Australia’s national dish. But with Australians wolfing down 1.1 billion snags a year, containing 1500 tonnes of salt, it’s putting our health at risk.

Media release: 
12/03/2018

An Australian-first study by Cancer Council NSW has revealed that kilojoule content in foods from some of Australia’s top fast food chains have remained the same since menu labelling became compulsory in 2012, despite rising obesity rates. 

Pages